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short fast strides or long strides?


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jtski908
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PostPosted: 05/25/05 - 08:14    Post subject: short fast strides or long strides?
ok, my times are definately coming down (thnx robp and others), and phar on my mile run i have eschewed the mp3. which does help me tune in and concentrate on pushing myself to run harder and not let up.

here is the question: which is better and why; longer strides or shorter faster strides? and why? or should i use different strides for different runs?

thnx,
Kel
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PostPosted: 05/25/05 - 08:20    Post subject:
For me, my legs wear out less when I run in slightly shorter strides with a higher turnover and I'm able to keep a higher pace for longer distances. I think it places less stress on the muscles, but I could be totally wrong. That's just what I've found works for me.
TOsteve
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PostPosted: 05/25/05 - 08:37    Post subject:
MastrBrewr wrote:
For me, my legs wear out less when I run in slightly shorter strides with a higher turnover and I'm able to keep a higher pace for longer distances. I think it places less stress on the muscles, but I could be totally wrong. That's just what I've found works for me.




Leave the long strides for those crazy sprinters. Wink
jtski908
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PostPosted: 05/25/05 - 09:19    Post subject:
so let me ask this....i am really concentrating on bringing down my 2 mile run. is a 2 mile considered a "sprint" and therefore my strides should shorten? i ask this, because as i reach the end of my 2 mile runs and i am really kicking as hard as i can, i can feel my stride start to lengthen....so should i concentrate on just increasing the amount of short strides i make (thereby increasing my speed), or is it okay to run a longer, faster stride as i finish up that last quarter mile?

again, trying to work smarter,
Kel
robp
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PostPosted: 05/26/05 - 08:51    Post subject:
The most important thing to me is that my stride feels comfortable no matter what speed I'm going. I think stride length increases naturally as you kick in the last 1/4 of a 2 mile run. The key to a fast two miler is a comfortable stride with steady or slightly increasing turnover rate for the first 1.75 miles. Having enough left to kick the last 1/4 or 1/8 of a mile is just icing on the cake.
Phar lap
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PostPosted: 05/26/05 - 21:00    Post subject:
Kel, leg speed plays an important part, however, stride length is also a component of fast running. Running speed is the product of length and frequency of stride, but the two factors are always inderpendent.

eg. Speed = rate * stride length.
= 4.5 strides/sec. * 2 metres.
= 9 metres/sec.
A lot relies on genitic inheritance but both can always be improved, with mobility, strength, technique training at speed (you don't even need motivational music Wink ) however without going into a lot of detail, I'll back up 'robp' comments, "feel comfortable no mater what speed you are going".

Kel, would be interested to know. Is your race against the clock or are you racing opponents?
Is it a track run/race?
jtski908
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PostPosted: 05/27/05 - 08:01    Post subject:
i am trying to improve my time. it is a run i have to do when i go to training school and i will be graded by how fast i can run it. my time is constantly decreasing and i am becoming more and more comfortable pushing myself to run faster and faster (read: my body does't panic when it becomes short of breath during a run), but, it seems as i grow faster new issues pop up; like this stride length concern, lol.

it will be on a hard surface, i believe the road.

i am pretty happy with the progress i am making, i just want to try to stay away from injuries and work as smart as i can.

ive found that smarter running gains improvements, whereas harder running gains injuries...

thanks,
Kel
HowarD
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PostPosted: 05/27/05 - 18:41    Post subject:
I take long strides. Ive never tried taking short strides.. too hard. I think it all has to do with personal preference and how long ur legs are i guess. I see people with short strides own in races and also people with long strides own/.
three one g
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PostPosted: 05/29/05 - 15:15    Post subject:
Same strides-per-minute
Longer strides = Faster
Shorter strides= Slower

Shorter strides can me faster than longer strides if you take more strides per minute, but Im under the influence that this makes you more tired.
running man
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PostPosted: 08/23/05 - 14:13    Post subject:
If you take long strides like me, you might end up overstriding. Overstriding will cause you to work harder in the long run, because your heel strikes the ground first, causing you to slow down.
You should have someone watch you run. Your feet should be landing below you, not in front of you.
I think everyone should focus on taking shorter, faster strides. It will pay off in the long run.
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