The time now is 04/18/14 - 19:15
Log in: Username: Password:
Search forums for:
  
JOIN RunningForums NOW!
FAQ Search    Articles Register Log in

New runner, can't run 1 mile


www.runningforums.com Forum Index -> Starting Line

Post new topic   Reply to topic
jogman
Newbie
Reply with quote
Joined: 21 Sep 2007
Posts: 3
| Back to top
PostPosted: 09/21/07 - 16:23    Post subject: New runner, can't run 1 mile
I'm applying for the armed forces, and can meet all of the fitness requirements for entry except the 1.5 mile run. When I applied I knew about the 1.5 mile run, but believed I could meet the standard (1.5 miles in 10 minutes) within the specified time (I'm not too fat - I'm an average build). Now, as time is dragging on, I'm in trouble. I have about 3 months (maybe more) to meet the standard. As I'm unemployed I can spend all day trying to improve if necessary. I am somewhat surprised at my lack of progress.

Basically, I can't even run 1 mile without stopping (stopping meaning slowing down to a walk). I've been running for 2 weeks now, with almost daily training. I started to notice that initially there was a slight improvement in the distance run, but it stopped improving. Today and the day before yesterday (I tried missing a day to see if that made any difference) I could actually run much LESS than I had done, before.

The problem is, I run my absolute maximum distance, and then I start walking. When I stop running, I feel like death is close (like my heart is going to explode). I don't have any health problems.

Now, what's causing this? I eat normal, healthy food with at least 5 portions of fruit a day. I don't smoke or drink. I have plenty of carbohydrates, and eat a lot of fish. I drink several litres of water constantly during the day. So, on paper I feel I should be making more progress.

Anyone got any ideas?
WingMan
Newbie
Reply with quote
Joined: 15 Sep 2007
Posts: 3
| Back to top
PostPosted: 09/21/07 - 22:43    Post subject:
hey man #1 good luck m8 in the armed forces 2nd try running more and more dont need to sprint try a distance run every sat. like 4miles at a slow pace then rest of the days jog 1 mile next day (or next 2 days) maybe run a little faster... MAKE SURE YOu stretch Very Happy
jogman
Newbie
Reply with quote
Joined: 21 Sep 2007
Posts: 3
| Back to top
PostPosted: 09/24/07 - 11:13    Post subject:
WingMan wrote:
hey man #1 good luck m8 in the armed forces 2nd try running more and more dont need to sprint try a distance run every sat. like 4miles at a slow pace then rest of the days jog 1 mile next day (or next 2 days) maybe run a little faster... MAKE SURE YOu stretch Very Happy


Thanks WingMan! Very Happy
That was very good advice indeed. I halved my running speed, and it was like I could run forever! I must have been running way too fast before.
JulieDonnelly
Member
Reply with quote
Joined: 14 Sep 2007
Posts: 26
Location: Houston, TX
| Back to top
PostPosted: 09/27/07 - 01:09    Post subject: running faster
First of all, good luck with your goal of getting into the Air Force Academy. I only know about muscles and I'm sure there will be a lot of people giving you good training ideas, so I'll give you my thoughts.

If your muscles are tight you just can't move fast because a muscle must be at its longest length before it contracts. if it's already shortened from repetitive strain, it can't contract the full length so you lose power. It might not even hurt (or it could), but the bottom-line is it's not pulling effectively so you tire out faster.

If you go to http://www.julstro.com you can read about repetitive strain injuries, and then go to the sections titled "Muscles and Pain," and "What's Happening Exactly." Start out by "ironing" out your quads (not hamstrings yet) with an 18" long length of 1 1/4" dowel (clothes closet pole -- get it at the lumber yard). Start at the very top of your thigh and press down. Don't roll to your knee, but press and slide to your knee. It may be tender so go as deep as is tolerable to you.

Then take a tennis ball and lie on your side. Put the ball at the area just above the top of your thigh bone. The name of the muscle is the tensor fascia lata. Press straight into that muscle. Gradually rotate your body so the ball s going along the sacrum. This will free up the lateral rotators.

Also, press your body weight into the ball while it goes around the top of your thigh bone, this is the insertion points of the lateral rotators.

After you have done all of these treatments, then it's safe to stretch your hamstrings. Don't stretch them first or you could possible tear them, even just a little bit.

Wishing you well,
Julie Donnelly
jogman
Newbie
Reply with quote
Joined: 21 Sep 2007
Posts: 3
| Back to top
PostPosted: 09/28/07 - 17:19    Post subject:
Thanks Julie. I'm not sure I understood your advanced stretching techniques but that's OK because I have been stretching lots, before running. I'm running 2 miles every other day now, and supplementing this with bodyweight exercises and short sprints, so I'm quite pleased with my progress. There is something useful about your post, and I'm going to go back and delete my previous posts for privacy reasons now. Thanks again
JulieDonnelly
Member
Reply with quote
Joined: 14 Sep 2007
Posts: 26
Location: Houston, TX
| Back to top
PostPosted: 09/29/07 - 15:58    Post subject: advanced stretching
Hi,

I'm glad to hear that things are progressing for you. The techniques I gave you are more than just advanced stretching, they actually force the lactic acid out of the muscle fibers so the fibers will lengthen normally. As long as the muscle fibers have excess lactic acid (a natural by-product of all the various exercises) the fibers will be unable to fully lengthen no matter how many stretches you do.

As you re-read the message slowly, you'll sort it out and see how easy it is to do the Julstro techniques I've suggested.

Wishing you well,
Julie Donnelly
TAE
Newbie
Reply with quote
Joined: 28 Sep 2007
Posts: 4
Location: MN
| Back to top
PostPosted: 10/01/07 - 11:00    Post subject: Re: New runner, can't run 1 mile
You need to SLOW DOWN! I know your goal is to run 1.5 in 10 minutes, but you need to slowly build up your speed.

I had this problem when I was starting out. I would run too fast, needing to stop for walk breaks all the time. I asked some experienced runners who told me to slow it WAY down to a pace where I felt like I could run forever.

You should not feel like your dying, with your heart beating out of your chest or you can't catch your breath. That means you're going to fast and you won't improve like that.

Slow it down for a while, to a pace where you can run a good distance (3 miles?) without stopping. Then work on improving your speed with intervals of speed running, or I've heard hills can really do the trick!

Good luck!
fifty26.2fifty
Newbie
Reply with quote
Joined: 07 Feb 2009
Posts: 1
Location: COB Spiecher, Iraq
| Back to top
PostPosted: 02/07/09 - 15:42    Post subject: Train to time not distance.
I recommend training for time not distance. Mix your run work outs with speed walk work outs. I'm not sure what the minimum distance is for your age for the PT test in the Air Force, but you must determine this time and train to this time. I'm a Captain in the Army and we must run 2 miles in our PT test. I'm constantly doing training to improve my speed. I do this through interval training, several sets of short sprints with short jogs in between each sprint. You need to set a goal and any time you set a goal you need the proper motivation to achieve this goal. I have some good motivation for you, this coming from an officer in the Army. As an officer in any military service you must maintain a high level of physical fitness, you must achieve above the standards. You will be able to do this, if you stay dedicated, and once you get into the Academy find someone to train with that will help you improve.
geraghtydurango
Newbie
Reply with quote
Joined: 18 Jul 2008
Posts: 14
Location: Durango,Colorado
| Back to top
PostPosted: 02/25/09 - 15:26    Post subject:
Maybe you start too fast. Run at a pace that you can carry on a conversation. If you are out of breath, you are running too fast. Trying running very slow in order to run without stopping. As you improve,you can run faster.

Gerry Geraghty
Endurance Fellowship
glavin
Newbie
Reply with quote
Joined: 13 Feb 2009
Posts: 7
| Back to top
PostPosted: 02/25/09 - 17:02    Post subject:
It is good to hear that you are improving. You still have time before your test so take it slow and don't hurt yourself. For the first couple of week just keep running about 2-3 miles 3 times a week and then you can go up to 4 days a week and so on. But always give your self a couple of weeks before each increase. for right now I wouldn't worry about any speed training. I would wait a little longer and when you do start doing a little speed training start out with just one day a week and gradually work your way up. Just take it easy and don't worry you will be able to pass the test with no problems.
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic All times are GMT - 4 Hours

www.runningforums.com Forum Index -> Starting Line

Page 1 of 1

Related topics:
As a runner, what body part (s) are you proud of?
Only a runner, and only in Philly...
If you could be an elite runner, would you?
Even as a runner, this annoyed the CRAP out of me.
New runner, pain question
Advice for very new runner, with asthma

 




Privacy Policy | Registration terms | Contact us